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Maryland's National Register Properties



Photo credit: Dean R. Wagner, 10/2002
Lake Evesham Historic District
Inventory No.: B-5088
Date Listed: 12/23/2003
Location: Baltimore, Baltimore City
Category: District
Period/Date of Construction: 1870-1946
Description: The Lake Evesham Historic District is a residential neighborhood in north Baltimore, just inside the city line. The district incorporates 260 buildings representing its development over the period 1870-1946. The district is characterized by a variety of house types and architectural styles typical of Baltimore's suburban communities from the late 19th century through the immediate post-World War II era. Several buildings represent the area's history from c. 1870 through the turn of the 20th century with vernacular interpretations of Victorian period styles; the majority of buildings in the district are bungalows and houses in various revival styles built in the 1920s and 1930s, when Lake Evesham was actively developed as a residential suburb. After about 1925, detached garages commonly accompanied the houses. Houses in the district are predominantly of wood frame construction, although a few brick houses occur as well. Many of the houses have associated garages. The district overall retains a high level of integrity. The most common alteration to houses within the district is the application of aluminum or vinyl siding, but this does not significantly affect their integrity, nor does it diminish the district's capacity to convey a sense of time and place through the rhythm of its old streetscapes, setbacks, and landscaping. Narrow roadways with stone-lined storm gutters and old growth trees contribute to a semi-rural atmosphere in Lake Evesham. Significance: The Lake Evesham Historic District is significant for its association with the suburban development of Baltimore, and as an example of a type of residential subdivision which characterized the area from the late 19th century through the immediate post-World War II era. Lake Evesham is distinctive among the subdivisions of north Baltimore for its diverse architectural character, comprising a variety of house types and architectural styles reflecting its development over the period c. 1870-1946. While several buildings survive to reflect the area's history from c. 1870 through the turn of the 20th century, the majority of houses in Lake Evesham were constructed in the 1920s, as a builder/developers responded to Baltimore's continuing growth by creating residential subdivisions along the York Road corridor north of the city. Although the neighborhood is the creation of several unrelated developers, the district conveys a distinctive sense of time and place through its architecture and the rhythm of its streets, setbacks, and landscaping.
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