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Maryland's National Register Properties



Photo credit: MHT Files, n.d.
Piscataway Village Historic District
Inventory No.: PG:84-23
Date Listed: 12/15/2011
Location: Floral Park Road & Piscataway Road (MD 223), Clinton, Prince Georges County
Category: District
Period/Date of Construction: 1747-1943
Description: The Piscataway Village Historic District includes approximately 116.58 acres south of the Piscataway Creek in southwestern Prince George's County. The survey area includes residential property types from the mid-18th century, the 19th century, and the early-20th century representing an array of notable styles and forms. These include the 18th-century Piscataway Tavern (c. 1750) with Federal addition (c. 1810) and the Georgian Hardy's Tavern (c. 1790), the Italianate Harbin House/Clagett Store (c. 1860) and the Colonial Revival Edelen House (c. 1830; 1926), and the Thomas C. Underwood Bungalow (c. 1928). In addition, the district contains properties exhibiting elements of the central cross gable and side-gable types. The district also includes St. Mary's Church, which was erected in the early 20th century on the site of an earlier chapel and is a good example of the Gothic Revival Style. The buildings are oriented to Floral Park Road, which runs through the middle of the district, with open space to the rear of the lots. The lack of modern infill and surrounding open space contributes to the feeling of a rural linear district. The district historically provided goods and services to surrounding farms and retains three former stores, two former taverns, one former post office, one former doctor's office, and a church. Significance: The Piscataway Village Historic District is historically significant as a notable collection of historic buildings that reflects development from an 18th century tobacco port to an early-20th century rural linear village. Piscataway includes a distinctly separate early crossroads community that developed at the intersection of roadways leading from Port Tobacco, Nottingham, and Upper Marlboro. Eighteenth-century growth of the district was made possible by Piscataway's designation as a tobacco inspection station in 1747. Throughout the 18th, 19th, and into the 20th centuries, it provided services to the surrounding agricultural community, including taverns, stores, a church, schools, and doctors. Many of the buildings associated with the village's development over time remain, while the population has remained the same or declined, conveying a sense of a rural linear village in an agricultural area. The district is also architecturally significant for its notable examples of 18th, 19th, and 20th century architectural styles and forms, as well as for its exemplification of specific types and periods of construction. The remaining surrounding fields and woodlots contribute to the sense of a rural village. Although the Edelen House (PG:84-23-6) is now separated from the rest of the village by Piscatway Drive, there is the connection of intervening open space. Despite loss of some of the 18th and 19th century dwellings to the village, the village retains the feeling of a linear historic district and lacks incompatible modern infill.
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