Photo credit: Michael O. Bourne , 03/1968

Property Name: Amelung House and Glassworks
Date Listed: 10/3/1973
Inventory No.: F-7-050,
Location: 2531, , Park Mills Road, , Adamstown, , Frederick County

Description: When Johann Friedrich Amelung came to Maryland in 1784, he bought about 2100 acres of heavily forested land in Frederick County. Here he built the Glassworks which he hoped would prove a profitable business in the newly formed United States. Today, there are no longer any above-ground remains of the factory, but Amelung’s late-Georgian brick home still stands on its stone foundation. The two-story building has a water table just above the stone foundation, and a belt course between the first and second floors. The front and west end of the house are constructed in Flemish bond brick, while the rear and east end are of English bond. Each end is two bays wide. The front is six bays across the second story, with two bays to the left of the door and three bays to the right on the first story. This front entrance has a wide door frame and a transom above its paneled door. Nine steps lead up to the large landing at this entrance. The windows on the first and second floors are double-hung with 12/12 lights. One tall, narrow interior chimney rises from each end of the gable roof. There is a wooden cornice with modillions under the eaves. The original 18th century interior paneling remains, except for that in the ballroom and card room, which were dismantled and sold in the 20th century. The large, deep windows are framed with paneling.

Significance: Fine examples of New Bremen glass work may be seen at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City; the Corning Museum of Glass in Corning, New York; and Winterthur Museum in Winterthur, Delaware. Today the only above-ground portion of the Glassworks that remains standing is John Frederick Amelung’s mansion house. A fine example of the late-Georgian, early-Federal period of American architecture, it is situated on a hill above the partially unearthed foundations of the factory that once produced some of the most beautiful glass ever made in America.




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