Photo credit: Not Available ,

Property Name: McCandless Archeological Site
Date Listed: 12/16/1983
Inventory No.:
Location: Cecil County

Description: The McCandless site is situated approximately 100 meters north of the Bumpstead site. Although very similar to that site, McCandless contained higher frequencies of black chert, only one primary biface reject of yellow jasper, and no jasper debitage. Seven black chert primary biface rejects in a wide range of sizes were recovered. In addition, one late stage projectile point, rejected due to minor damage during the finishing process, was recovered. Also present was a carefully worked unifacial scraper with a pressure flaked graver, suggesting that hunting/processing activities took place. The site represents a reduction component similar to that at the Bumpstead site. It is another secondary reduction site associated with an unidentified black chert quarry. Side-notched points found at the site suggest an Archaic association.

Significance: This site is the second of three reduction/habitation sites recorded in the northern black chert complex. The similarity with and proximity to the Bumpstead site suggest that the area was subjected to periodic reoccupation in the cycle of lithic procurement, tool production, and maintenance. The sites listed in the Delaware Chalcedony Complex Thematic Group contain artifacts indicative of the entire series of tool production activities for the prehistoric inhabitants of the Upper Delmarva Peninsula region. For most prehistoric groups of this region stone tools were the basis of their food procurement and processing activities and the manufacture of these tools was a critical activity in their lives. Therefore, the sites in this particular group provide an opportunity to study an important activity of prehistoric groups that should shed considerable light on their adaptations and lifeways. The significance of the sites in this group is underscored by the fact that the cryptocrystalline outcrops of the Delaware Chalcedony Complex are unique to the Upper Delmarva Peninsula. Each site represents one or more spatially separated stages in the sequence of lithic procurement and utilization. Therefore, the sites must be considered collectively, within the context of the group, in order to illustrate the entire process.




close